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24 Charts Of Leadership Styles Around The World

Different cultures can have radically different leadership styles, and international organizations would do well to understand them.

British linguist Richard D. Lewis charted these differences in his book “When Cultures Collide,” first published in 1996 and now in its third edition, and he teaches these insights in seminars with major corporate clients.

From structured individualism in the U.S. to ringi-sho consensus in Japan, the charts seem intuitively correct, if not unilaterally true across a country.

Lewis acknowledges the risks of dealing in stereotypes: “Determining national characteristics is treading a minefield of inaccurate assessment and surprising exception. There is, however, such a thing as a national norm.”

He argues that these patterns won’t change any time soon: “Even in countries where political and economic change is currently rapid or sweeping, deeply rooted attitudes and beliefs will resist a sudden transformation of values when pressured by reformists, governments or multinational conglomerates.”

With permission from the author, we are posting 24 charts of leadership styles from his book, with a brief summary of his comments about each below:

 

Leadership Charts Layout_02

crossculture.com

British managers are diplomatic, casual, helpful, willing to compromise, and seeking to be fair, though they can be ruthless when necessary. Unfortunately, their adherence to tradition can result in a failure to comprehend differing values in others.

American managers are assertive, aggressive, goal and action oriented, confident, vigorous, optimistic, and ready for change. They are capable of teamwork and corporate spirit, but they value individual freedom and their first interest is furthering their own career.

French managers tend to be autocratic and paternalistic, with an impressive grasp of the many issues facing their company. Opinions of experienced middle managers and technical staff may be dismissed.

Swedish management is decentralized and democratic. The rationale is that better informed employees are more motivated and perform better. The drawback is that decisions can be delayed.

Charts taken and text summarized from “When Cultures Collide” with permission from author Richard Lewis.

Source: Business Insider
Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/leadership-styles-around-the-world-2013-12#ixzz2xl3JIjID

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