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IBM reveals its top five innovation predictions for the next five years

IBM reveals its top five innovation predictions for the next five years

IBM director of education transformation Chalapathy Neti.

IBM revealed its predictions for five big innovations that will change our lives within five years.

Bernie Meyerson, vice president of innovation at IBM.

Bernie Meyerson, the vice president of innovation at IBM.

The IBM “5 in 5″ is the eighth year in a row that IBM has made predictions about technology, and this year’s prognostications are sure to get people talking. We discussed them with Bernie Meyerson, the vice president of innovation at IBM, and he told us that the goal of the predictions is to better marshal the company’s resources in order to make them come true.

“We try to get a sense of where the world is going because that focuses where we put our efforts,” Meyerson said. “The harder part is nailing down what you want to focus on. Unless you stick your neck out and say this is where the world is going, it’s hard to you can turn around and say you will get there first. These are seminal shifts. We want to be there, enabling them.”

(See our complete interview with Meyerson here).

In a nutshell, IBM says:

  • The classroom will learn you.
  • Buying local will beat online.
  • Doctors will use your DNA to keep you well.
  • A digital guardian will protect you online.
  • The city will help you live in it.

Meyerson said that this year’s ideas are based on the fact that everything will learn. Machines will learn about us, reason, and engage in a much more natural and personalized way. IBM can already figure out your personality by deciphering 200 of your tweets, and its capability to read your wishes will only get better. The innovations are being enabled by cloud computing, big data analytics (the company recently formed its own customer-focused big data analytics lab), and adaptive learning technologies. IBM believes the technologies will be developed with the appropriate safeguards for privacy and security, but each of these predictions raises additional privacy and security issues.

As computers get smarter and more compact, they will be built into more devices that help us do things when we need them done. IBM believes that these breakthroughs in computing will amplify our human abilities. The company came up with the predictions by querying its 220,000 technical people in a bottoms-up fashion and tapping the leadership of its vast research labs in a top-down effort.

Here’s some more detailed description and analysis on the predictions.

In five years, the classroom will learn you.

In five years, the classroom will learn you to help tailor instruction to your individual needs.

The classroom will learn you

Globally, two out of three adults haven’t gotten the equivalent of a high school education. But IBM believes the classrooms of the future will give educators the tools to learn about every student, providing them with a tailored curriculum from kindergarten to high school.

“Your teacher spends time getting to know you every year,” Meyerson said. “What if they already knew everything about how you learn?”

In the next five years, IBM believes teachers will use “longitudinal data” such as test scores, attendance, and student behavior on electronic learning platforms — and not just the results of aptitude tests. Sophisticated analytics delivered over the cloud will help teachers make decisions about which students are at risk, their roadblocks, and the way to help them. IBM is working on a research project with the Gwinnett County Public Schools in Georgia, the 14th largest school district in the U.S. with 170,000 students. The goal is to increase the district’s graduation rate. And after a $10 billion investment in analytics, IBM believes it can harness big data to help students out.

“You’ll be able to pick up problems like dyslexia instantly,” Meyerson said. “If a child has extraordinary abilities, they can be recognized. With 30 kids in a class, a teacher cannot do it themselves. This doesn’t replace them. It allows them to be far more effective. Right now, the experience in a big box store doesn’t resemble this, but it will get there.”

In five years, buying local will beat online as you get online data at your fingertips in the store.

In five years, buying local will beat online as you get online data at your fingertips in the store.

Buying local will beat online

Online sales topped $1 trillion worldwide last year, and many physical retailers have gone out of business as they fail to compete on price with the likes of Amazon. But innovations for physical stores will make buying local turn out better. Retailers will use the immediacy of the store and proximity to customers to create experiences that online-only retail can’t replicate. The innovations will bring the power of the Web right to where the shopper can touch it. Retailers could rely on artificial intelligence akin to IBM’s Watson, which played Jeopardy better than many human competitors. The Web can make sales associates smarter, and augmented reality can deliver more information to the store shelves. With these technologies, stores will be able to anticipate what a shopper most wants and needs.

And they won’t have to wait two days for shipping.

“The store will ask if you would like to see a certain camera and have a salesperson meet you in a certain aisle where it is located,” Meyerson said. “The ability to do this painlessly, without the normal hassle of trying to find help, is very powerful.”

This technology will get so good that online retailers are likely to set up retail showrooms to help their own sales.

“It has been physical against online,” Meyerson said. “But in this case, it is combining them. What that enables you to do is that mom-and-pop stores can offer the same services as the big online retailers. The tech they have to serve you is as good as anything in online shopping. It is an interesting evolution but it is coming.”

In five years, doctors will routinely use your DNA to keep you well.

IBM

In five years, doctors will routinely use your DNA to keep you well.

Doctors will use your DNA to keep you well

Global cancer rates are expected to jump by 75 percent by 2030. IBM wants computers to help doctors understand how a tumor affects a patient down to their DNA. They could then figure out what medications will best work against the cancer, and fulfill it with a personalized cancer treatment plan. The hope is that genomic insights will reduce the time it takes to find a treatment down from weeks to minutes.

“The ability to correlate a person’s DNA against the results of treatment with a certain protocol could be a huge breakthrough,” Meyerson said. It’ll be able to scan your DNA and find out if any magic bullet treatments exist that will address your particular ailment.

IBM recently made a breakthrough with a nanomedicine that it can engineer to latch on to fungal cells in the body and attack them by piercing their cell membranes. The fungi won’t be able to adapt to these kinds of physical attacks easily. That sort of advance, where the attack is tailored against particular kinds of cells, will be more common in the future.

In five years, a digital guardian will protect you online.

In five years, a digital guardian will protect you online.

A digital guardian will protect you online

We have multiple passwords, identifications, and devices than ever before. But security across them is highly fragmented. In 2012, 12 million people were victims of identity fraud in the U.S. In five years, IBM envisions a digital guardian that will become trained to focus on the people and items it’s entrusted with. This smart guardian will sort through contextual, situational, and historical data to verify a person’s identity on different devices. The guardian can learn about a user and make an inference about behavior that is out of the norm and may be the result of someone stealing that person’s identity. With 360 degrees of data about someone, it will be much harder to steal an identity.

“In this case, you don’t look for the signature of an attack,” Meyerson said. “It looks at your behavior with a device and spots something anomalous. It screams when there is something out of the norm.”

In five years, the city will help you live in it.

In five years, the city will help you live in it.

The city will help you live in it

IBM says that, by 2030, the towns and cities of the developing world will make up 80 percent of urban humanity and by 2050, seven out of every 10 people will be a city dweller. To deal with that growth, the only way cities can manage is to have automation, where smarter cities can understand in real-time how billions of events occur as computers learn to understand what people need, what they like, what they do, and how they move from place to place.

IBM predicts that cities will digest information freely provided by citizens to place resources where they are needed. Mobile devices and social engagement will help citizens strike up a conversation with their city leaders. Such a concept is already in motion in Brazil, where IBM researchers are working with a crowdsourcing tool that people can use to report accessibility problems, via their mobile phones, to help those with disabilities better navigate urban streets.

Of course, as in the upcoming video game Watch Dogs from Ubisoft, a bad guy could hack into the city and use its monitoring systems in nefarious ways. But Meyerson said, “I’d rather have the city linked. Then I can protect it. You have an agent that looks over the city. If some wise guy wants to make the sewage pumps run backwards, the system will shut that down.”

The advantage of the ultraconnected city is that feedback is instantaneous and the city government can be much more responsive.

Source: http://venturebeat.com

How your Phone could be able to Smell, Hear and Taste by 2018: IBM Reveals its Vision for the Future of Technology

IBM has revealed its predictions for the computer we will all be using in 2018 – and it believes they will have all five senses, and will communicate with us in radically different ways.

‘Infrared and haptic technologies will enable a smart phone’s touchscreen technology and vibration capabilities to simulate the physical sensation of touching something,’ the firm said.

IBM's vision for the future of touch - it claims that in five years we will be able to touch objects through our phones

IBM’s vision for the future of touch – it claims that in five years we will be able to touch objects through our phones

‘So you could experience the silkiness of that catalog’s Egyptian cotton sheets instead of just relying on some copywriter to convince you.

‘It’s amazing when you look back over the 60+ years of the computing revolution and see how far we have come in such a relatively short time,’ said IBM’s Bernard Meyerso.

‘The first electronic programmable computers, built in the 1940s, were essentially really fast electronic calculators.

 Then came the mainframe, the PC, the Internet and social networking.

Today, we’re entering the era of cognitive computing–machines that help us think.’

‘One of the most intriguing aspects of this shift is our ability to give machines some of the capabilities of the right side of the human brain.

‘New technologies make it possible for machines to mimic and augment the senses. ‘

Today, we see the beginnings of sensing machines in self-parking cars and biometric security–and the future is wide open.

The firm claims in five years machines will be able to see, and understand, imagesThe firm claims in five years machines will be able to see, and understand, images

‘These five predictions show how cognitive technologies can improve our lives, and they’re windows into a much bigger landscape –the coming era of cognitive systems.

‘But the point isn’t to replicate human brains.

We humans are no slouches when it comes to procreation.

‘And this isn’t about replacing human thinking with machine thinking.

‘Once again; not necessary.

‘Rather, in the era of cognitive systems, humans and machines will collaborate to produce better results–each bringing their own superior skills to the partnership.

‘The machines will be more rational and analytic. We’ll provide the judgment, empathy, morale compass and creativity.’

IBM also says machines will be able to hear in five years and know when we are talking to themIBM also says machines will be able to hear in five years and know when we are talking to them

Computers will also be able to taste - and even predict what food we like based on out eating habits.

Computers will also be able to taste – and even predict what food we like based on out eating habits.

Computers will also be able to smell - and have sensitive enough noses to be able to detect infections on our breath and tell us if the food we are about to eat has bacteria in

Computers will also be able to smell – and have sensitive enough noses to be able to detect infections on our breath and tell us if the food we are about to eat has bacteria in

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2249504/IBM-reveals-vision-future-technology.html#ixzz2FKsbaytT

 
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Apigee Explores What Smartphone Users Are Buying Via Mobile-Infographic

Apigee InfographicOn Thursday, the team at Apigee published new research showing that mobile phones are increasingly being used to buy almost everything – including no shortage of items considered to be “embarrassing.”

Apigee explored the opinions of more than 2,000 U.S. mobile device users in a “scientific survey” to discover why America is falling in love with mobile phone shopping.

So what are the biggest turn-ons for mobile users? Here’s what Apigee says are the most popular attributes of mobile shopping:

  • You can browse for deals wherever you are – 50%
  • Perform price comparisons inside a store – 48%
  • Use a mobile device to find a retail store – 40%
  • Redeem electronic coupons – 38%
  • Secretly shopping without a spouse/significant other knowing – 25%
  • Buy embarrassing or personal items without using a work computer – 14%
  • Sneak shopping time in at work – 12%

According to consumer feedback through the survey, the items that mobile users are most inclined to purchase are:

  • Books – 32%
  • Electronics – 31%
  • Gift cards – 27%
  • DVDs/Blu-ray Discs – 26%
  • Clothing – 24%
  • Toys – 20%

To learn more about the report from Apigee, check out the infographic below.(Source: MobileMarketingWatch)

Apigee Infographic for Mobile Buying Statistics

Apigee Infographic for Mobile Buying Statistics

42 Major Countries Ranked By Smartphone Penetration Rates

Here are the 42 countries, ranked in order of their smartphone penetration rate percentage, per capita. You also see the ranking, the name of the country, the national population rate, the national mobile phone subscriber count, and the migration rate of mobile subcribers to smartphones; and finally the rate of smartphone penetration per capita.

Rank . Country . . . . . Population . . Subs . Sm’phones . Migr.Rt . . Per Capita

1 . . . . Singapore . . . . . . . . . 4.9 . . . 8.1 . . . 4.4 . . . . 54% . . . . 90%
2 . . . . Hong Kong *** . . . . . 8.0 . . . 14.0 . . . 4.9 . . . . 35% . . . . 61%
3 . . . . Sweden . . . . . . . . . . 9.3 . . . 13.6 . . . 4.8 . . . . 35% . . . . 52%
4 . . . . Australia . . . . . . . . . 21.6 . . . 29.8 . . . 10.2 . . . . 34% . . . . 47%
5 . . . . Spain . . . . . . . . . . . 45.5 . . . 58.9 . . . 20.8 . . . . 35% . . . . 46%
tie 6 . . Denmark * . . . . . . . 5.5 . . . 7.6 . . . 2.4 . . . . 32% . . . . 44%
tie 6 . . Israel *** . . . . . . . . 7.0 . . . 11.0 . . . 3.1 . . . . 28% . . . . 44%
tie 8 . . Finland * . . . . . . . . 5.4 . . . 9.6 . . . 2.3 . . . . 24% . . . . 43%
tie 8 . . Norway * . . . . . . . . 4.9 . . . 6.2 . . . 2.1 . . . . 34% . . . . 43%
10 . . . New Zealand ** . . . . 4.3 . . . 5.5 . . . 1.8 . . . . 33% . . . . 42%

11 . . . UK . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62.1 . . . 82.4 . . . 25.0 . . . . 30% . . . . 40%
tie 12 . Italy . . . . . . . . . . . . 60.2 . . . 87.8 . . . 22.8 . . . . 26% . . . . 38%
tie 12 . Netherlands . . . . . . 16.7 . . . 19.7 . . . 6.3 . . . . 32% . . . . 38%
tie 14 . Austria . . . . . . . . . 8.4 . . . 13.0 . . . 3.0 . . . . 23% . . . . 36%
tie 14 . Taiwan *** . . . . . . . 23.0 . . . 31.0 . . . 8.2 . . . . 26% . . . . 36%
tie 16 . Greece ** . . . . . . . . 11.2 . . . 15.6 . . . 3.9 . . . . 25% . . . . 35%
tie 16 . Ireland ** . . . . . . . . 4.6 . . . 5.6 . . . 1.6 . . . . 29% . . . . 35%
tie 16 . Portugal ** . . . . . . . 10.7 . . . 17.0 . . . 3.7 . . . . 22% . . . . 35%
tie 16 . USA . . . . . . . . . . . 319.1 . . 319.4 . . 111.8 . . . . 35% . . . . 35%
20 . . . South Korea ***** . . . 48.6 . . . 54.0 . . . 16.4 . . . . 30% . . . . 34%

tie 21 . Canada ** . . . . . . . . 34.1 . . . 26.5 . . . 10.4 . . . . 39% . . . . 30%
tie 21 . Switzerland * . . . . . 7.6 . . . 9.7 . . . 2.3 . . . . 24% . . . . 30%
tie 21 . France . . . . . . . . . 62.8 . . . 66.0 . . . 18.8 . . . . 28% . . . . 30%
tie 24 . Germany . . . . . . . . 82.0 . . 107.7 . . . 23.0 . . . . 21% . . . . 28%
tie 24 . Belgium* . . . . . . . . 10.7 . . . 12.8 . . . 3.0 . . . . 23% . . . . 28%
tie 26 . Poland ** . . . . . . . 38.0 . . . 49.2 . . . 7.1 . . . . 14% . . . . 19%
tie 26 . Malaysia ** . . . . . . 28.1 . . . 36.6 . . . 5.2 . . . . 14% . . . . 19%
28 . . . Russia ** . . . . . . . 140.0 . . 234.4 . . . 25.0 . . . . 11% . . . . 18%
29 . . . South Africa . . . . . 50.6 . . . 58.8 . . . 8.7 . . . . 15% . . . . 17%
tie 30 . Czech Rep ** . . . . 10.4 . . . 14.2 . . . 1.7 . . . . 12% . . . . 16%
tie 30 . Hungary ** . . . . . . 10.0 . . . 11.4 . . . 1.6 . . . . 14% . . . . 16%

32 . . . Thailand ** . . . . . . 68.3 . . . 78.3 . . . 10.0 . . . . 13% . . . . 15%
tie 33 . Japan ***** . . . . . . 126.9 . . 126.8 . . . 18.1 . . . . 14% . . . . 14%
tie 33 . Brazil ** . . . . . . . . 197.7 . . 229.5 . . . 28.0 . . . . 12% . . . . 14%
tie 33 . Romania ** . . . . . 21.1 . . . 31.0 . . . 2.9 . . . . 9% . . . . 14%
36 . . . Turkey . . . . . . . . . 76.0 . . . 66.3 . . . 8.3 . . . . 13% . . . . 11%
37 . . . Ukraine ** . . . . . . 45.0 . . . 52.1 . . . 4.5 . . . . 9% . . . . 10%
tie 38 . Indonesia **** . . . . 229.0 . . 212.0 . . . 18.1 . . . . 9% . . . . 8%
tie 38 . Mexico ** . . . . . . . 111.1 . . . 99.3 . . . 8.7 . . . . 9% . . . . 8%
40 . . . Slovakia ** . . . . . . . 5.4 . . . 6.5 . . . 0.4 . . . . 6% . . . . 7%

41 . . . China ** . . . . . . . . 1360.0 . . 961.3 . . . 77.1 . . . . 8% . . . . 6%
42 . . . India ** . . . . . . . . 1220.0 . . 973.0 . . . 33.2 . . . . 3% . . . . 3%

(no star) average of both studies (best number)
* using surrogate data for Netsize, then averaged (second best number)
** using only Netsize/Informa data
*** only using Google/Ipsos data
**** Indonesia: using only half of rate from Google/Ipsos (because surveyed only city penetration)
***** Japan and S Korea: These numbers are NOT indicative of how advanced phones are in those countries, while technically are reasonably accurate measures of ‘only smartphones’

Graphical View

Smartphone_Penetration

42 Major Countries Ranked By Smartphone Penetration Rates

Source for above: TomiAhonen Consulting Analysis December 2011, based on raw data from Google/Ipsos, the Netsize Guide/Informa, and TomiAhonen Almanac 2011 reported data

The Most Popular Android Phones by Country in Asia

Animoca’s games are played by tens of millions of Android gamers. So the company has a good feel for which phones are the most popular in different areas around the world.

Check out the infographic to see what’s popular in various places in Asia. The data are based on usage in July.

The graphic is based on usage data on the Animoca Android network (which is described here)

It shows that Samsung (especially Galaxy SII) dominates every key smartphone market in the region except for Japan, where Sony holds the top spot. India is the only nation where low-end phones are popular.

The largest battlefield is China, where the race is extremely close between the Samsung Galaxy SII and the Samsung Galaxy Note.

Source: Venturebeat & Animoca

Difference in market share between number 1 and 5 phones

South Korea 25.87%
Hong Kong 20.9%
Singapore 18.7%
Taiwan 13.4%
Japan 11.4%
India 10.1%
China 4.2%

Animoca Android Phone Market Share Infographic – Click to enlarge

 

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